RESEARCH ARTICLE


How Betrayal Affects Emotions and Subsequent Trust



Wing Shing Lee1, Marcus Selart2, *
1 I-Shou University, Department of International Business Administration, Office No 1, Sec. 1, Syucheng Rd, Dashu District, Kaohsiang City 84001, Taiwan
2 Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Strategy and Management, Helleveien 30, NO 5045 Bergen, Norway


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© 2015 Lee and Selart.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode). This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Strategy and Management, Helleveien 30, NO 5045 Bergen, Norway; Tel: +47 55959695; E-mail: Marcus.Selart@nhh.no


Abstract

This article investigates the impact of different emotions on trust decisions taking into account the experience of betrayal. Thus, an experiment was created that included one betrayal group and one control group. Participants in the betrayal group experienced more intense feelings governed by negative emotions than participants in the control group did. Moreover, participants in the betrayal group significantly lowered their trust of another stranger. On the other hand, we found some evidence that neuroticism exaggerated the relationship between experienced betrayal and subsequent trust.

Keywords: Betrayal , emotions, trust, decision making, neuroticism.